Two IBA Events Announced!

The Manitoba IBA Program is involved in organising two upcoming blitzes, one at Oak Lake and Plum Lakes IBA and the other, a morning bird survey blitz with NCC at East Shoal Lake. Posters are attached, but here are some details

Oak Lake and Plum Lakes, June 3rd

Oak Lake is one of Manitoba’s premier places for grassland and wetland birds. Huge numbers of waterbirds breed in the area. We recently recommended to the IBA Canada Program a change in the boundary to take in the Maple Lakes and Pipestone areas. There is a huge colony of Franklin’s Gulls in the Maple Lakes, at least 50,000 noted by provinical biologist Ken De Smet in 2017, and we would love to get an estimate of numbers in 2018. There are also grassland birds around Pipestone and along the west of the lake, shorebirds around the Plum Lakes, and Red-headed Woodpeckers in various places. Basically, this place is a gem!

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East Shoal Lake, June 9th

We will be surveying areas in and around the NCC’s East Shoal Lake property on June 9th. We will focus on Species At Risk. This will take the form of a smaller, more localised blitz, with the focus on locating threatened species. There might be some early, early morning surveys looking for such glories as Yellow Rail and Least Bittern, but this will be confirmed later on once we have scoped the status of the habitats. Unlike other IBA blitzes, this will involve more footwork, walking on tracks.

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If you are interested in any of this, please email  and we will get you signed up!

North, West, and East Shoal Lakes IBA Bird Blitz

On Sunday, May 6th, 14 birders split into 4 groups and covered over 177 km of the North, West, and East Shoal Lakes IBA (IBA map). With a late start to spring this year we were not sure what to expect in terms of species diversity and numbers. On Saturday, the day before the blitz, Tim Poole and Lynnea Parker noted that ice coverage on Lake Manitoba was still quite extensive at Sandy Bay Marshes IBA near Langruth. Lynnea was therefore glad to observe that West and East Shoal Lakes were mostly ice-free. North Shoal Lake was partially open along the roadsides and marshes.

122 species were observed in the morning with good numbers of waterfowl and grebes. Group 1 with Pierre, Bill, Wally, and William were particularly fond of the 171 American Robins and 159 Red-winged Blackbirds they thoroughly counted. However, the robins and blackbirds paled in comparison to the 611 Western Grebes which were spotted rafting together at West Shoal Lake (Group 1 checklist).

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View of West Shoal Lake with a large number of Western Grebes rafting in the distance, photo by Pierre Richard

western grebe 1 William Rideout

Western Grebe, photo by William Rideout

At the Sandy Bay Grebe Watch event on May 5th, Tim and Lynnea had been hoping to see several hundred Western Grebes. Due to the heavy ice cover, only 112 Western Grebes were counted. It would seem our missing Grebes were over at West Shoal Lake instead! A further 500 were spotted by Bob Jones at Delta Marsh the previous day.

Group 2 with Jo, Betsy, Christian, and Mohammad surveyed the east side of East and North Shoal Lakes. Christian turned back the clock and took up his Atlas nickname ‘Moose Legs’, walking the rejuvenated wetland also known as PR415, which runs between North and East Shoal Lakes (Christian’s Checklist). The decommissioned, and partially flooded road was highly productive with 94 species, including high counts of waterfowl, Double-crested Cormorant, American White Pelican, American Coot, Sandhill Crane, Gulls, and Blackbirds. Unfortunately for Christian, he missed the Snowy Egret spied by Group #4 which was found on the same decommissioned road just outside his survey area to the west. Group #4 didn’t feel bad however, as Christian managed to find a Clark’s Grebe which they didn’t see. Photos below feature a pair of Lesser Yellowlegs (upper left), pair of Canvasbacks (middle left), flock of American White Pelicans (lower left), and a Marbled Godwit preening (right) (photos by Christian Artuso). (Additional checklists for this group: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5)

 

 

Group 3 with Joanne, Richard, Louise, and Eric surveyed the IBA area north of North Shoal Lake. They had many species of waterbirds despite having less open water in their area. Good sights from Group 3 included 4 Trumpeter Swans, 18 Red-necked Grebes, and 1 Semipalmated Plover (Checklist). The photos below by Joanne Smith include Red-necked Grebe (Left) and Willet (Right).

 

 

Group 4 with Lynnea, Cam, and Jeff surveyed the northern part of West Shoal Lake, west side of East Shoal Lake, and west side of North Shoal Lake. The highlights from this group included a Snowy Egret, good numbers of Green-winged Teal and Blue-winged Teal, and 11 Great Egret. Access to the open water was limited, but the marshy areas were moderately productive. Photos below were taken by Cam Nikkel and feature a Forster’s Tern (Left) and a Great Egret (Right).

 

 

Overall, highlights of the day included: 13 Greater White-fronted Goose, 766 Western Grebe, 1 Clark’s Grbe, 490 American White Pelican, 6 American Bittern, 32 Great Egret, 1 Snowy Egret, 3 Black-crowned Night-Heron, 116 Sandhill Crane, and 58 Bonaparte’s Gull.

After the morning blitz everyone gathered at Rosie’s Cafe in Inwood for a glorious lunch before wrapping up the event.

Compiled IBA Event Checklist:

Snow Goose 1,455
Ross’s Goose 8
Greater White-fronted Goose 13
Cackling Goose 9
Canada Goose 1,554
Trumpeter Swan 8
Tundra Swan 99
Wood Duck 2
Blue-winged Teal 340
Northern Shoveler 73
Gadwall 59
American Wigeon 26
Mallard 591
Northern Pintail 42
Green-winged Teal 428
Canvasback 662
Redhead 75
Ring-necked Duck 145
Greater Scaup 7
Lesser Scaup 313
Greater/Lesser Scaup 4
Bufflehead 31
Common Goldeneye 17
Hooded Merganser 4
Common Merganser 18
Red-breasted Merganser 8
Ruddy Duck 19
Ruffed Grouse 1
Sharp-tailed Grouse 1
Common Loon 15
Pied-billed Grebe 45
Horned Grebe 56
Red-necked Grebe 36
Eared Grebe 1
Western Grebe 766
Clark’s Grebe 1
Double-crested Cormorant 479
American White Pelican 490
American Bittern 6
Great Blue Heron 14
Great Egret 32
Snowy Egret 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron 3
Turkey Vulture 1
Osprey 2
Northern Harrier 11
Cooper’s Hawk 1
Bald Eagle 15
Broad-winged Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 17
Virginia Rail 3
Sora 3
American Coot 537
Sandhill Crane 116
American Avocet 8
Semipalmated Plover 1
Killdeer 41
Marbled Godwit 19
Pectoral Sandpiper 1
Wilson’s Snipe 52
Wilson’s Phalarope 7
Greater Yellowlegs 22
Willet 23
Lesser Yellowlegs 114
Bonaparte’s Gull 58
Franklin’s Gull 1,305
Ring-billed Gull 2,802
Herring Gull 102
gull sp. 742
Caspian Tern 3
Common Tern 3
Forster’s Tern 173
Mourning Dove 15
Belted Kingfisher 7
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 31
Downy Woodpecker 3
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 28
Pileated Woodpecker 1
American Kestrel 6
Merlin 4
Eastern Phoebe 9
Blue Jay 6
Black-billed Magpie 25
American Crow 13
Common Raven 15
Tree Swallow 98
Barn Swallow 35
Black-capped Chickadee 2
Marsh Wren 23
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 7
Eastern Bluebird 4
Hermit Thrush 4
American Robin 208
Gray Catbird 1
European Starling 15
American Pipit 5
Orange-crowned Warbler 6
Palm Warbler 6
Yellow-rumped Warbler 5
LeConte’s Sparrow 2
American Tree Sparrow 2
Chipping Sparrow 1
Clay-colored Sparrow 6
Lark Sparrow 2
Fox Sparrow 1
White-crowned Sparrow 9
Harris’s Sparrow 1
White-throated Sparrow 7
Vesper Sparrow 3
Savannah Sparrow 53
Song Sparrow 115
Lincoln’s Sparrow 1
Swamp Sparrow 52
Yellow-headed Blackbird 665
Western Meadowlark 23
Red-winged Blackbird 2,676
Brown-headed Cowbird 54
Rusty Blackbird 104
Brewer’s Blackbird 32
Common Grackle 115
Purple Finch 1